A Last Parade

posted in: High Place | 0
bong bong street 2017, tulip time parade
bong bong street 2017, tulip time parade
tulip time, bowral 2018
tulip time, bowral 2018
tulip time, bowral 2018
tulip time, bowral 2018
tulip time, bowral 2018
bong bong street 2017, tulip time parade
bong bong street tulip time parade
bong bong street tulip time parade
bong bong street 2017, tulip time parade
bong bong street tulip time parade
bong bong street tulip time parade
bong bong street tulip time parade
bong bong street tulip time parade
bong bong street tulip time parade
bong bong street tulip time parade
bong bong street 2017, tulip time parade
bong bong street 2017, tulip time parade. police horses
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE
TITLE

In past years, the annual tulip flower festival in Bowral, New South Wales, was heralded by early morning road races and a lively community parade along Bong Bong Street.

The parade garnered robust attendance and appeared to enjoy strong backing from the locals. Nevertheless, it has ceased to occur. These images capture a glimpse of spectators and local organisations participating in the final two Tulip Time Parades of 2017 and 2018.

The Enigmatic Burrowing Habit of the Pobblebonk Frog

posted in: Various | 0
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
Pobblebonk or Eastern Banjo Frog
 

In the vast and diverse landscape of Australia, one might expect to encounter a multitude of unique creatures, each with its own fascinating adaptations for survival. Among these, the Australian Pobblebonk frog (Limnodynastes dumerilii) stands out not only for its distinctive call but also for its intriguing burrowing behaviour.

The Pobblebonk frog, often referred to simply as the Eastern Banjo Frog, is a species found across eastern Australia, from Queensland to South Australia, inhabiting a variety of wetland habitats such as swamps, marshes, and temporary ponds. However, what sets this frog apart is its penchant for subterranean living.

Unlike many other frog species that primarily dwell in water or surface vegetation, the Pobblebonk frog has adapted to spend much of its time underground. This burrowing behaviour serves several crucial purposes for the frog’s survival.

Firstly, burrowing provides protection from predators and extreme environmental conditions. By retreating into the soil, the Pobblebonk frog can escape the heat of the Australian sun during the day and avoid potential threats from birds, reptiles, and other predators. Additionally, burrowing helps to maintain moisture levels essential for the frog’s skin, which is important for respiration and thermoregulation.

The burrowing habit of the Pobblebonk frog also facilitates reproduction. During periods of rainfall, typically in spring and summer, these frogs emerge from their burrows to breed. Males produce their distinctive “bonk” or “pobblebonk” call to attract females, often from within their burrows or nearby water bodies. Once mating occurs, females lay eggs in shallow water, which hatch into tadpoles that develop within these aquatic environments.

Interestingly, while the Pobblebonk frog spends much of its time underground, it is not a permanent resident of its burrow. Instead, it utilises a system of shallow tunnels dug into moist soil, often near water sources. These tunnels provide a refuge for the frog to retreat to during dry spells or periods of extreme heat, allowing it to conserve energy and minimise water loss.

The burrowing behaviour of the Pobblebonk frog highlights its remarkable adaptation to the Australian environment. By seeking refuge underground, this amphibian has found a unique niche that offers protection, moisture, and opportunities for reproduction.

buy a print, worldwide delivery

Bowral SES Kookaburra Rescue

posted in: Various | 0

Our property is shared with at least one mob of Kookaburra who often engage in some serious, and very noisy, squabbles. In 2018 one of these birds became trapped in a chimney shaft. The NSW State Emergency Service (SES) Wingecarribee Unit attended and effected a very professional rescue.

A WIRES wildlife rescue volunteer then provided a couple of days recuperation for the bird before it was released to rejoin mob.

Link to Wingecarribee SES NSW unit

Link to WIRES, NSW Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service Inc.
WIRES rescue and cares for wildlife under a license issued by NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service. The WIRES Rescue Office can be reached 365 days a year by calling 1300 094 737

Buy A Print